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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

5 edition of Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic linguistics. found in the catalog.

Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic linguistics.

Alo Raun

Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic linguistics.

by Alo Raun

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  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Indiana University; distributed by Humanities Press, New York in Bloomington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Finno-Ugric languages.,
  • Finnic languages.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    SeriesIndiana University publications. Uralic and Altaic series, v. 107
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPH14 .R3
    The Physical Object
    Pagination128 p.
    Number of Pages128
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4380463M
    ISBN 100877500851
    LC Control Number78633848

      In several postings in mid-January I discussed Finno-Ugric languages (see here, here and here). However, one issue I didn’t not discuss there is the peculiar distribution of Finnic-speaking peoples. The languages from the Finnic branch of the Finno-Ugric family are spoken in two geographically non-contiguous areas: (a) around the Baltic Sea and in Northern [ ]. Introduction to Estonian Linguistics ; Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic Linguistics, ; The Definite Superlative in Finnic, ; Eesti keele etümoloogiline teatmik. Rooma; Toronto: Maarjamaa (2. p. ). Lähteet.

    2. Uber die form des Gen.-Dat. Pl. im Albanischen. Zur methode der vergleichenden sprachforschung; VIII. Fenno-Ugrica and Altaica; 1. The character and the scale of Turkic influence on the structure of Finno-Ugric languages (by Bereczki, Gabor); 2. Lexical innovations of the Volga-Finnic epoch (by Decsy, Gyula); 3. Finno-Ugric (/ ˌ f ɪ n oʊ ˈ juː ɡ r ɪ k / or / ˌ f ɪ n oʊ ˈ uː ɡ r ɪ k /), Finno-Ugrian or Fenno-Ugric is a traditional grouping of all languages in the Uralic language family except the Samoyedic commonly accepted status as a subfamily of Uralic is based on criteria formulated in the 19th-century and is often criticized by contemporary linguists. The three most.

    Pohjoismaiden suurin antikvariaatti ja divari, josta löydät normaalia kirjakauppaa laajemman valikoiman ja edullisemmin. Myös paljon keräilyharvinaisuuksia!   There is one linguistic theory that links languages from Finland to Japan in a group called the Ural-Altaic languages. However, I think that idea has been rather well debunked. The pendulum may change as more research is done. It would probably be.


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Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic linguistics by Alo Raun Download PDF EPUB FB2

Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic Linguistics Paperback – January 1, See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Hardcover $ 3 Used from $ 4 New from $Manufacturer: Indiana University.

Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic linguistics. Bloomington, Indiana University; distributed by Humanities Press, New York [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Alo Raun.

Finno-Ugric (/ ˌ f ɪ n oʊ ˈ juː ɡ r ɪ k / or / ˌ f ɪ n oʊ ˈ uː ɡ r ɪ k /; Fenno-Ugric) or Finno-Ugrian (Fenno-Ugrian), is a traditional grouping of all languages in the Uralic language family except the Samoyedic formerly commonly accepted status as a subfamily of Uralic is based on criteria formulated in the 19th century and is criticized by some contemporary Geographic distribution: Eastern, Central and.

Finno-Ugric languages fĭn´ō-o͞o´grĭk, also called Finno-Ugrian languages, group of languages forming a subdivision of the Uralic subfamily of the Ural-Altaic family of languages (see Uralic and Altaic languages).

The Finno-Ugric group of languages can be divided into two subgroups, Finnic and Ugric. Finno-Ugric languages, group of languages constituting much the larger of the two branches of a more comprehensive grouping, the Uralic languages (q.v.). The Finno-Ugric languages are spoken by several million people distributed discontinuously over an area extending from Norway in the west to the.

About the book: In Chinese Scholars on Inner Asia, some of the best work of the past half-century by leading Chinese scholars on the history and peoples of Inner Asia is presented for the first time in English. The fifteen essays were selected by a team of contemporary Chinese specialists to represent the unique and important contributions made.

See B. Collinder, An Introduction to the Uralic Languages () and Survey of the Uralic Languages (2d ed. ); A. Raun, Essays in Finno-Ugric and Finnic Linguistics (, repr. Finno-Ugric. This volume offers an important contribution to the comparative historical study of languages.

Most of the articles deal with topics concerning the Indo-European proto-language as well as the individual languages descended from it.

Essays in Finno-Ugric philology complete the volume. The book is divided in 8 sections: I. Indo-European, II. The rise of agriculture, identification of new cultural waves in terms of language are topics that outline the early prehistory in the North.

The book contains twelve articles by linguists and archaeologists, evidence drawn from various Finno-Ugric and Indo-European languages, and up-to-date insights into the research of prehistoric Northern.

‘Within the Finno-Ugric languages, there are two major groups, the Finnic languages and the Ugric languages.’ ‘For Finno-Ugric genetics, which do not necessarily align with Finno-Ugric linguistics, see this related page written by another scholar for Virtual Finland.’.

Fenno-Ugrica is the National Library of Finland’s digital collection of Finno-Ugric publications. The Fenno-Ugrica collection includes monograph publications in Ingrian, Veps, Mari (Hill Mari and Meadow Mari) and Mordvinic (Erzyan and Moksha) languages and newspapers in Mari and Mordvinic languages from the s and the s.

Finno-Ugric. One test of the difficulty of any language is how much of the grammar you must know in order to express yourself on a basic level.

On this basis, Finno-Ugric languages are complicated because you need to know quite a bit more grammar to communicate on a basic level in them than in say, German.

Finnic Northern. Finnic definition, a subdivision of the Finno-Ugric branch of the Uralic language family that includes Finnish, Estonian, Lapp, Mordvin, Udmurt, Mari, and Komi. See more. restricted to Finno-Ugric languages yet have a wide distribution. Likewise, if a word appears in other languages, it may be, in fact a loan.

Lastly, words restricted to Finno-Ugric languages, but with a narrow distribution, can be assumed to be fairly new.

Next, the article considers the oldest common lexical stratum of the Uralic languages. Facing Finnic: Some Challenges to Historical and Contact Linguistics (Castrenianumin toimitteita) on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

There is well over a century of solid scholarship backing the Uralic family (this is, as you know, the name currently applied to this language family by linguists, rather than Finno-Ugric [or Ugro-Finnic], because Uralic includes Samoyedic, while Finno-Ugric stricto sensu does not).

More recently, Uralic-Yukaghir has been gaining acceptance as. The name "Uralic" derives from the family's original homeland commonly hypothesized to be in the vicinity of the Ural -Ugric is sometimes used as a synonym for Uralic, though Finno-Ugric is widely understood to exclude the Samoyedic languages.

Scholars who do not accept the traditional notion that Samoyedic split first from the rest of the Uralic family may treat the terms as. Wolfgang Veenker in his work on the Finno-Ugric substratum in the Russian language cites three cases of Finno-Ugric influence on Russian: (1) the non-application of so-called akan’e, the pattern of reduction of certain unstressed vowels; (2) the so-called nominal sentence, lacking the copula in the present tense; and (3) the use of the.

Finno-ugric definition, the major branch of the Uralic family of languages, subdivided into Finnic, which includes Finnish and Estonian, and Ugric, which includes Hungarian. See more. Uralic languages - Uralic languages - Languages of the family: The two major branches of Uralic are themselves composed of numerous subgroupings of member languages on the basis of closeness of linguistic relationship.

Finno-Ugric can first be divided into the most distantly related Ugric and Finnic (sometimes called Volga-Finnic) groups, which may have separated as long ago as five millennia. Interpretations and misinterpretations of Finno-Ugric language relatedness.The answer depends mainly on what to be considered as a writing systen.

If we regard a picrtogram writing system (e.g. similar to Daba script) to be a writing system as well, then the answer to your question is positive. A travelog by Ahmad ibn Fadlan mentions two kinds of writing system used by who later were identified as Komi ancestors called Wisu (which sounds similar to Balto-Fennic Veps.Finno-Ugric languages (fĬn´ō-ōō´grĬk), also called Finno-Ugrian languages, group of languages forming a subdivision of the Uralic subfamily of the Ural-Altaic family of languages (see Uralic and Altaic languages).The Finno-Ugric group of languages can be divided into two subgroups, Finnic and Ugric.

These languages have about 24 million speakers distributed in enclaves scattered in a.